Governor Retreats After Churches Expose Him

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Image credit to commons.wikimedia.org. Image modified from original.

5 churches pressed lawsuits stating that Gov, J.B Pritzker was ignoring science, Pritzker immediately eased out his order limiting assemblies to ten folks or less.

On Thursday, Pritzker explained that the I.D.P.H (Illinois Department of Public Health) only endorsed guidelines and did not impose restrictions on church leaders to utilize their initiatives to guarantee the safety and health of their patrons.

Illinois immediately alleviated their targeted social distancing guidelines on religious organizations.

Thomas More Society spoke for 3 of the churches, whose senior counsel and vice president criticized Illinois for implementing strict and rigid lockdown orders in the United States, without considering citizen's rights to express their faith and neglect to scientific evidence.

Peter Breen, an attorney, announced that it was a “complete and total victory for people of faith” after Pritzker and his administration exploited the pandemic crisis to castigate on the liberty of the people of faith in Illinois.

A specialized consultant to churches, George Delgado, M.D., explained in an announcement “a limit on the number of persons attending church services diminishes the risk of transmission to a far smaller degree than other prophylactic measures that churches can implement.”

George Delgado, M.D., indicated evidence of the possibility of getting infected by the virus inside the church is 12-percent of the risk of getting infected in a mall. “and no one is arguing that going to the grocery store is not safe.”

Martin Whittaker (Thomas More Society Senior Counsel) claimed that 1 out of 5 churches that filed charges against Pritzker were funded by the state to put up food pantries in its vicinity for the people of Illinois.

The pantry had 25 people in the building at one time, but the church was forbidden from hosting service exceeding the limited number of ten people.

“There is no logic that can defend why a Sunday worship gathering would be more dangerous to one's health than a food pantry distribution in the same location, with the same number of people. Yet the former is prohibited, and the latter encouraged,” Whittaker said.

“That is blunt defiance of the Illinois Constitution's Bill of Rights and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act.”

Churches in several states are challenging restrictions on gathering orders by Democratic governors, claiming the measures burden the fundamental right to free exercise of religion.

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